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Puerto Rico DroughtWatch

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Picture of Guajataca Lake, 1994.

DATA CENTER

Real-Time Data

Streamflow:
PR
Groundwater:
PR | VI
Water Quality:
PR
Precipitation:
PR
Lake/Reservoir:
PR
Data Mapper:
PR | VI

Historical Data

Streamflow:
PR | VI
Groundwater:
PR | VI
Water Quality:
PR | VI
Annual Data Reports
PR | VI
Duration hydrographs:
PR

WaterWatch

Flooding:
PR
Drought:
PR
Current conditions:
PR
Water quality:
PR

Groundwater networks

Water Levels:
PR
Climate Response:
PR

*VI=Virgin Islands

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USGS Water Science Centers are located in each state.

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Drought and Groundwater

Groundwater, which is found in aquifers below the land surface, is one of the nation's most important natural resources. Groundwater provides drinking water for a large part of the nation's population, supplies business and industries, and is used extensively for irrigation.

Groundwater can also contribute to surface water supplies. Some groundwater seeps into rivers and lakes, and can flow to the surface as springs.

The water level in an aquifer that supplies water to a well does not always remain constant. Droughts, seasonal variations in rainfall, and pumping affect the height of aquifer water levels. If a well is pumped at a faster rate than an aquifer is recharged by precipitation or other source of recharge, water levels in the well can drop. This can happen during drought, due to the extreme deficit of rain.

Long-term water-level data are fundamental to the resolution of many of the most complex problems related to ground-water availability and sustainability. Significant periods of time - years to decades - typically are required to collect the water-level data needed to assess the effects of climate variability, to monitor the effects of regional aquifer development, or to obtain data sufficient for analysis of water-level trends.

Groundwater Watch

Map of the Puerto Rico Active Water Level Network




Map generated Tuesday, 19-Sep-2017 09:25:15 EDT

For a real-time map of Groundwater conditions, please navigate to the Puerto Rico Active Water Level Network page.

Explanation of the Percentiles classes

A percentile is a value on a scale of 100 that indicates the percentage of a distribution that is equal to or below that value. See more



The U. S. Geological Survey (USGS) groundwater network for the Caribbean currently consists of wells in which groundwater levels are continuously monitored.

Information for individual wells:

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